Joachim Schmid

Bilder von der Straße (series 41-141-241-341-441-541-641-741-841-941), 1982 – 2012, found photographs mounted on card, 29 x 21.5 cm [each]

Bilder von der Straße [detail]

Bilder von der Straße [detail]

Bilder von der Straße [detail]

Bilder von der Straße [detail]

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Bilder von der Straße (series 41-141-241-341-441-541-641-741-841-941) is a project that references a constellation of found photographs that were left abandoned on pavements of various locations. Spanning thirty years from 1982 to 2012, the work probes the desire to destroy and desecrate lived moments and memories.

Bilder von der Straße (series 41-141-241-341-441-541-641-741-841-941), 1982-2012, [one of ten found photographs mounted on card]

Bilder von der Straße (series 41-141-241-341-441-541-641-741-841-941), 1982-2012, [one of ten found photographs mounted on card]

Bilder von der Straße (series 41-141-241-341-441-541-641-741-841-941), 1982-2012, [one of ten found photographs mounted on card]

Bilder von der Straße (series 41-141-241-341-441-541-641-741-841-941), 1982-2012, [one of ten found photographs mounted on card]

Security Check, 1985-1987, eight b/w prints, 13 x 18 cm [each]

Security Check, 1985–1987 consists of photographs taken by the artist as he passed through airport security checks, gestures and impressionistic partial views are caught on his camera. The body is in transit, performing a specific task characterised by a set of gestures indicative and specific to our modernity.

Security Check, 1985-1987, [one of eight b/w prints]

Security Check, 1985-1987, [one of eight b/w prints]

Security Check, 1985-1987, [one of eight b/w prints]

Security Check, 1985-1987, [one of eight b/w prints]

X Marks the Spot, 2013, twenty-one pigment ink prints, 18 x 24 print on 24 x 30 cm paper [each]

Dallas, Texas, Dealey Plaza. The site where John F. Kennedy was assassinated is a major tourist magnet. X Marks the Spot, 2013 consists of images showing the memorial in action, as people stop to have their photograph taken. White Xs on the pavement mark the site where the president was fatally shot—in the middle of a freeway on-ramp. For personal documentation, visitors often wait for a pause in traffic, hurrying to one of the crosses and have their photograph taken, leaving the road before the next stream of traffic. A webcam is positioned in a window on the sixth floor of the former Texas School Book Depository, the site where, on November 22, 1963, an assassin allegedly fired the shots that killed Kennedy as the presidential motorcade passed through Dealey Plaza. The camera’s perspective matches exactly that of the assassin: it now photographs the tourists documenting their own memorial photos, the viewer witnessing this in real time. The work shows events that unfold when people presume they are unobserved. The doubling of the lens, a frame within a frame, reveals qualities of the space of collective memory and how our relationship and responses to historical acts is constantly in formation, asking: what is a monument, and what can its function be?

O Campo, 2010, four pigment ink prints, 40 x 50 cm [each]

O Campo, 2010, depicts Brazilian football fields in cities. As the images are taken via satellite, the lack of uniformity and the ad-hoc nature of these fields are revealed. The Brazilian desire for football is well-documented and these fields herald the socio-political context of the game in Brazil. According to FIFA’s laws of the game, these pitches would fail their regulatory framework. The work speaks to these contradictions, between reality and expectation, the micro and macro.

Statics (women’s fashion catalogue), 1999, shredded photographs and printed matter, 60 x 80 cm
Statics (men’s fashion catalogue), 1999, shredded photographs and printed matter, 60 x 80 cm
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TEXTS

Le jeu avec la condition figurative
By Pascale Krief, Artpress, number 25 November 2019

Orphans In the Storm
By Stephen Shore, Elephant Magazine, Issue 21, Winter 2015

Un explorateur en photographie
By Valentine Plisnier, Camera, number 8, Winter 2015

Observing by Watching: Joachim Schmid and the Art of Exchange
By Geoffrey Batchen, Aperture, number 210, Spring 2013

El arribo del arte contemporáneo a la fotografía
By Natalia de León, Revista DOSSIER, number 33, July-August 2012

Hunter and Gatherer
Interview with Joachim Schmid, Album, Magazin für Fotografie, number 2: Same/Same

«Tausend Himmel» et principe d’équivalence • “Tausend Himmel” and the Equivalence Principle
By Joël Vacheron, Volume, number 1, June 2010

I Am Not a Photographer
Simone Menegoi, Mousse, number 10, September 2007

The Accidental Predator
Sarah Andress, Art on Paper, volume 12, number 2, November 2007

Photography, Anonymity and the Archive: Joachim Schmid
Mark Durden, Parachute, number 109, 2003

BIOGRAPHY

Joachim Schmid (b. 1955, Balingen, Germany) lives and works in Berlin.

Since the 1980s Schmid’s image-based practice has focused on the recycling of vernacular photography, while in recent decades he has directed attention to the Internet and the frantic proliferation of images characterising our contemporary visual economy. He has participated in solo and group exhibitions worldwide, including at Lieu d’Art et Action contemporaine de Dunkerque (2015), the Museum Folkwang in Essen (2014), the Fotomuseum Winterthur (2014), the Gagosian Gallery in New York (2013), the Musée de l’Elysée in Lausanne (2012), the Museo di Fotografia Contemporanea, Cinisello-Balsamo/Milan (2012), the Cleveland Museum of Art (2012), the Centre de la photographie Genève (2010), Les Rencontres d’Arles (2008), and The Photographers’ Gallery in London (2007). He has published over one hundred artist books. His works can be found in public collections internationally, such as the Bibliothèque nationale de France in Paris, the Daelim Contemporary Art Museum in Seoul, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Maison Européenne de la Photographie in Paris, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and the Pitt Rivers Museum in Oxford.

 

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