Charlotte Johannesson

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

Untitled, 1981-85, digital computer graphics, installation view, Take Me To Another World, Museo Reina Sofía, 2021

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World, 1982-85, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm

Trained as a weaver, Johannesson began to make tapestries as art in the 1970s, creating work that often satirised mainstream politics. In 1978, Johannesson traded her loom for an Apple II Plus, the first generation of personal computers. Teaching herself to program, she transferred the same dimensions from her weave to the computer (239 pixels on the horizontal side and 191 pixels on the vertical).

Mud Muses – A Rant About Technology, Moderna Museet, Stockholm, 2019 – 2020

Installation view, PRESSURE/IMPRINT, Malmö Konsthall, Sweden, 2017 – 2018. Photo: Helene Toresdotter

Our World, 1984, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm
Indian, 1982 – 85, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm

Installation view, 32nd São Paulo Biennial, São Paulo, Brazil, 2016. Photo: Leo Eloy/Estúdio Garagem

Installation view, PRESSURE/IMPRINT, Malmö Konsthall, Sweden, 2017 – 2018. Photo: Helene Toresdotter

Installation view, 32nd São Paulo Biennial, São Paulo, Brazil, 2016. Photo: Perdigão/GCom-MT

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Textile

I’m No Angel, 1972-3/2017 [remake], wool,
165 x 100 cm

I’m No Angel, 1972-3/2017 [remake], wool,
165 x 100 cm [detail]

No Choice Amongst Stinking Fish, 1970/2016 [remake], wool, 100 x 60 cm
Chile eko i skallen, 1973/2016 [remake], wool,
108 x 59 cm
Terror, 1970/2016 [remake], linen, wool, leather, pins, pencil sharpener, needle, wire, buttons, 121 x 60 cm

Terror, 1970/2016 [remake], linen, wool, leather, pins, pencil sharpener, needle, wire, buttons, 121 x 60 cm [detail]

Plotter prints

Walk 3, 1983, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm [framed]

Transformation, 1983, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm [framed]

World, 1984, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm [framed]

Boy George, English Singer, 1983, original plotter print, 52 x 42 x 3.50 cm [framed]

Guardian?, 1984, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm [framed]

Notes in Space, 1982 – 85, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm [framed]

Joseph Beuys, 1983, original plotter print, 42 x 52 x 3.50 cm [framed]

Victoria Benedictsson, Swedish Author, 1984, original plotter print, 52 x 42 x 3.50 cm [framed]

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Sculpture

Installation view, SOLO, Hollybush Gardens, London, 2018

Human 21, 2017, 3D Prints, 23.5 x 16.5 cm [each]

Human 21, 2017, 3D Prints, 23.5 x 16.5 cm [detail]

Human 21, 2017, 3D Prints, 23.5 x 16.5 cm [detail]

Human 21, 2017, 3D Prints, 23.5 x 16.5 cm [detail]

Human 21, 2017, 3D Prints, 23.5 x 16.5 cm [detail]

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Painting

A pixelated figure reoccurs throughout her practice. It can be found in the weave Terror, 1970, in several of the plotted prints, the installation of 3D prints, and in the new painting Human, 2018. Marching forward, this figure is suggestive of Johannesson’s underlying interest in the constant human quest for knowledge.

Human, 2018, acrylic on canvas, 72 x 92 x 2.50 cm
Kamel 1, 2003, acrylic on canvas, 85 x 70 cm
Kamel 2, 2003, acrylic on canvas, 85 x 70 cm
Kamel 3, 2003, acrylic on canvas, 85 x 70 cm

In the ‘90s, Johannesson embarked on a series of caravan paintings, each including a camel and a palm tree. Johannesson considers the caravan as the internet of ancient times as they facilitated communication across gigantic deserts. She is also fascinated by the singularity of the camel, their endurance and mysticism.

Each is a Universe, 2018, acrylic on canvas with organic matter, 81 x 65 x 4 cm
More Matter, Less Art, 2018, acrylic on canvas with organic matter, 81 x 65 x 6 cm

TEXTS

Critics’ Picks: Charlotte Johannesson
Review by Dan Ward, Artforum, 6 June 2022

Eight standout shows to see during London Gallery Weekend
Exhibition Round-up by Laura Allsop, Art Basel Stories, 10 May 2022

The best exhibitions to see at London Gallery Weekend 2022
Exhibition Round-up by Ben Luke, Evening Standard, 6 May 2022

Pixel Pioneer
Interview by Robert Stasinski, Kunstkritikk, 17 May 2021

Review: Pressure | Imprint
Review by Kristian Vistrup Madsen, ArtReview, January/February 2019

Rhea Dall and Charlotte Johannesson: STATION TO STATION
Interview by Rhea Dall, Bulletins of the Serving Library, Issue 4, September 2012

BIOGRAPHY

Charlotte Johannesson (b. 1943, Malmö, Sweden) lives and works in Skanör, Sweden. Her practice involves working with both the craft technology of the loom and the digital technology of computer programming, exploring their formal and conceptual connections. Trained as a weaver, Johannesson began creating tapestries as art in the 1970s, work that often satirised mainstream politics. In 1978, funded by The National Swedish Board for Technology and Development, she established the Digital Theatre with her partner, Sture Johannesson, in Malmö, Sweden. As Scandinavia’s first digital arts laboratory, the Digital Theatre functioned as an independent platform for both research and artistic projects and has been described as one of the most advanced Apple systems of its time, consisting of seven computers, printers, monitors and synthesisers. From these early experiments across textile and technology, Johannesson’s practice has developed to encompass a range of media including: weaving, painting, digital print and digital slideshows. Across these media, Johannesson continues to challenge the conditions of image-making and to enhance the synchronicity between material and digital production. 

A survey exhibition of Johannesson’s work, Take Me to Another World, opened at Museo Reina Sofia, Madrid, 2021, curated by Mats Stjernstedt and Lars Bang Larsen. In July 2022, Johannesson will present a solo exhibition at Badischer Kunstverein, followed by a major monographic exhibition at Nottingham Contemporary in February 2023. Johannesson’s work has been exhibited internationally, including The 59th International Art Exhibition of La Biennale di Venezia, The Milk of Dreams, Venice, Italy; HEM (HOME), Malmö Konstmuseum, Malmö, Sweden; Unweaving the binary code — Hannah Ryggen Triennale, Kunsthall Trondheim, Trondheim, Norway (all 2022); Our Silver City, 2094, Nottingham Contemporary, UK (2021); The Blazing World, S|2 Gallery, Sotheby’s, London (2019); Mud Muses, Moderna Museet, Stockholm (2019); Still I Rise: Feminisms, Gender, Resistance, Act 2, De La Warr Pavilion, Bexhill on Sea, UK (2019); pressure | imprint, Malmö Konsthall, Sweden (2018); Nordic Pavilion, Venice Biennale (2017); 32nd São Paulo Biennale (2016); Textila Undertexter, Marabouparken Konsthall, Sweden (2016); The Society without Qualities, Tensta Konsthall, Spånga, Sweden (2013); Forms of Resistance, Van Abbemuseum, Eindhoven, Netherlands (2007); and Pyramid of Mars, Barbican Centre, London, and Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh, and Trapholt Museum, Kolding, Denmark (2000).

 

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